About bethany_powell

Bethany Powell spent her teen years in Japan, forever ruining her for mediocre rice and ethnocentrism. She has published primarily fantasy poetry, like in Inkscrawl, Through the Gate, and Heroic Fantasy Quarterly. Bethany is also a fiber artist of handspun yarn, trying to make every skein a story.

PLIV – Paradise Lost Writer’s Workshop

This weekend I learned to wield the Dumb Stick.

I am back from a long weekend in San Antonio, for a second round at Paradise Lost. It’s a workshop and writing retreat limited to alums of Viable Paradise, Taos Toolbox, or members of the SF/F pro forum Codex.

Essentially, this means people who have made a step toward becoming pro in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy field. But because of the specific circles involved, there were lots of connects, via classes of students from the workshops or activity on the Codex Forum. It’s easier to get to know people with certain Venn diagram overlaps in experience…

I feel this photo successfully portrays everyone's personalities...

Themes of the weekend that developed out of the lectures and chats this time were: no one “arrives” and is set for life in publishing… but you can make your own luck by being ready. It may seem a bit mechanical to write to certain structures or even formulaic, but it’s how a professional creates a book that fundamentally works. A publishing career is a crapshoot, so let it be about the fact that you love to write.

And maybe, love to hang out with other writers and talk about the craft?

girl table selfieI hope to post a compilation of recommended books, and an overview of our exercises in “plot breaking”.

First, though, I wanted to post a little more good press for this small workshop. If you can get in, the structure is great with enough food for thought that socializing time is energized, there is free time to write…or better yet, break your book and remake it with other fantastic writer-people helping you out. This is where the Dumb Stick comes into play.

Let’s do this again next year!

Tumblr is an odd blogging format–geared more toward resharing photos and humorous posts than creating your own content. But I’ve taken to it–it’s the scene for young adults, of whom I am fond and also consider my audience.

I started to move my suit-style blog onto a more visible blog from WordPress (no offense to WP; I just don’t have a platform of my own yet and Tumblr’s tag-surfing is active) and since I found a wealth of K-Pop fans to interact with I’ve moved my main energies to my Tumblr blogs.

One thing I was surprised to find got some response was posts of my poetry. I’ve been meaning for a while to include my website here in the loop, when I decide to release a poem for free, instead of continuing to send it around to magazines.

Launching from “mean to” into practice starting… now!

After I Stopped Wearing Red

I made this path myself,
trek after trek.
It winds around the wildflowers,
so each spring it’s different.

The shadows here are deeper than before.

I’ve been on this path all my life,
it seems,
I can’t remember not walking it.
It lies between two halves of my heart,
beautiful with broad-leaved trees.

The shadows here move more often than before.

It is all the same,
even my shoes on it.
I recognize the dust that lies on them
but can’t believe it;
us back on this ground like it’s nothing.

The shadows haven’t had a smell, a name before.

But grandmother is well
and mother is well,
and the hunter is well and I, too,
will be well.

These shadows have been slain before.

 

article for Denizen Magazine – for Third Culture Kid

I pitched an idea for an essay to this lovely webzine, publishing articles on being a child of different cultures, and worked with the editor to put together a personal account of how grief comes into returning “home” sometimes.

Writing something so personal for publication was a new experience, as was publishing non-fiction at all. I am proud of it, and of being part of this cool magazine.

“You Can’t Go Home Again”

We left Yonezawa before 6 a.m., in January. My too-big-for-Japan family clambered into a van with half our belongings crammed into suitcases around us.

We were moving back to the States, and my heart was breaking.

…read the rest here

In Harmony With Ghosts

New poem out!

Or rather, it was new when it was published some time ago. I updated my bibiography but didn’t make a post.

In Harmony With Ghosts

Like “Kami“, this poem is directly written from experience of temples in Japan when I was living there as a teen. I think it’s great that Strong Verse has published both my semi-paranormal travel poems. It’s technically not a spec verse magazine, but I’ve kinda warped it my way a little…

Meta-Memoir

For the year 2013, I have a blog project started–

the posting of my teen journals of moving to Japan, and the following adventures or misadventures.

Of course, 13 y.o. me was hilariously precocious and serious about writing, BUT there is some editing and expansion to be done. So I’m writing a simultaneous commentary, from me, at 26.

Should be full of LoLs, or at least, a lot of pathos. (and bathos. I WAS a teenager.)

Nikki and the B-Sides

SFPA poetry contest

My poem “An Herbwife Lives by the Dragons’ Eyrie” was a finalist, but ultimately didn’t place in the SFPA contest. It was fun to enter something like this, and actually place, though! It has a different sort of feeling from getting personalized rejections from markets…

Looking at the lovely poetry that did place, I can see why mine may have been a choice for one of the initial readers and not the judge–the collection of winning poetry has a definite weird sci-fi beauty, a consciousness of the universe.

Go see them!

2012 Science Fiction Poetry Association Contest Winners

Things you would pack when taken a hostage.

Through the Gate‘s first issue has been posted, and it is lovely, lovely!

I am so pleased to have a poem in it.

Things you would pack is one I’ve really liked in that particular shy, fierce way since I wrote it. I feel odd about the recording I made of it (it seems a little dry and commonplace) but how else to read a poem that is meant to be commonplace?

Give it a look, or a listen!